2013 Canada Regular Uncirculated Proof Like Set

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2013 Canada Regular Uncirculated Proof Like Set

Catalog #: RCM2013-PL

$32.00

In stock

2013 Canada Regular Uncirculated Proof Like Set (Type 1 – Regular)

Every coin that is minted in Canada is a work of art. Each represents an aspect of our unique history and extraordinary geography. The 2013 Uncirculated Set, which contains the six denominations of coins produced this year, is a striking collection of some of Canada’s most famous iconography.

Specifications:
Item number: 121284
Mintage: 75,000
Finish: Uncirculated
Certificate: Serialized insert card

Face value: 2 dollars
Composition: Three-ply nickel finish plated steel (outer ring) Three-ply brass finish plated aluminum bronze (inner core)
Weight (g): 6.92
Diameter mm): 28
Edge: Interrupted serrations

Face value: 1 dollar
Composition: Three-ply brass plated steel
Weight (g): 6.27
Diameter mm): 11-sided 26.50
Edge: Plain

Face value: 25 cents
Composition: Three-ply nickel finish plated steel
Weight (g): 4.4
Diameter mm): 23.88
Edge: Reeded

Face value: 10 cents
Composition: Three-ply nickel finish plated steel
Weight (g): 1.75
Diameter mm): 18.06
Edge: Reeded

Face value: 5 cents
Composition: Three-ply nickel finish plated steel
Weight (g): 3.95
Diameter mm): 21.20
Edge: Plain

Special Features:
Canadian Icons
– Polar Bear: Canada’s bi-metallic two-dollar coin, launched in 1996, features a polar bear, one of the world’s largest terrestrial carnivores, which can weigh up to 650 kilograms. It lives near the cold seas and frozen ice of Canada’s far-north.

– Common Loon: Launched in 1987, on the reverse of the one-dollar coin, this image represents a common loon swimming against the rugged backdrop of the Canadian Shield. The loon’s haunting calls are one the quintessential sound of the Canadian wilderness.

– Canada’s Coat of Arms: The Canadian Coat of Arms, proclaimed in 1921 and modified in 1996, reminds Canadians of our diverse heritage. It features images from France (the fleur-de-lis), England (the three royal lions and rose), Scotland (a lion and thistle) and Ireland (the Irish harp and shamrock).

– Caribou: An enduring symbol of the Canadian north, the majestically-antlered caribou has remained a Canadian icon since first appearing on the twenty-five-cent piece in 1936.

– Bluenose: In 1921, Atlantic Canadians built one of the finest racing and fishing vessels in Canadian history, the Bluenose. The ship first appeared on the ten-cent piece in 1937.